The Furious Gazelle

Literary as hell.

Month: October 2014 (page 2 of 2)

“The Hills are Undone” and “Two” by Charles Bane

The Furious Gazelle is continuing to serialize Charles Bane’s new book of poetry, Love Poems. You can find more of his poetry here.

The Hills Are Undone

The hills are undone
by you when you
walk home carrying
a sheep in your arms
and I watch the folds
of you and my certainty
is alarmed. I’m conquered;
Judea is my legs, Yisrael is
my arms.

Two

It defies logic so
Beautifully, this love.

Fall my love and I will
Rake the leaves.

Charles Bane, Jr. is the American author of The Chapbook (Curbside Splendor, 2011) and Love Poems (Kelsay Books, 2014). His work was described by the Huffington Post as “not only standing on the shoulders of giants, but shrinking them.” A writing contributor for The Gutenberg Project, he is a current nominee as Poet Laureate of Florida.

Art by W. Jack Savage

Climbing the Old, Dry Waterfall by W. Jack Savage
Climbing the Old Dry Waterfall

W. Jack Savage is a retired broadcaster and educator. He is the author of seven books including Imagination: The Art of W. Jack Savage (wjacksavage.com). Jack and his wife Kathy live in Monrovia, California.

Dining for One by Brian Doyle

Click here to read Dining for One, a new short play by Brian Doyle.
Dining for One will be produced by the Midtown International Theatre Festival’s Short Play Lab Series on October 25 and 26 the Roy Arias Studios, 300 West 43rd Street, 4th Floor, in New York City.
It will be directed by John Camera and will feature Guy Ventoliere, Destiny Marie Shegstad and David Wetter.
More details may be found at www.midtownfestival.org.

 

Brian Leahy Doyle
Brian Leahy Doyle is a director, dramaturge, writer, and teacher of theatre. Brian received his undergraduate training at the University of Wisconsin at Platteville, where he majored in English and minored in theatre with an emphasis in dramatic literature. He earned his MFA in Theatre, with emphases in Directing, Dramaturgy, and Voice, at the University of Utah. While at the University of Utah, he was the first resident dramaturge of the Pioneer Theatre Company and was largely responsible for initiating this position. After graduate school, Brian moved to the East Coast and worked as a dramaturge for the George Street Playhouse and the Whole Theatre. He then began an active freelance directing career, staging plays in such regional theaters as the Whole Theatre, Cincinnati Theatre Festival, and Louisville’s Classics in Context, and such off-Broadway venues as the Irish Arts Center, Riverside Shakespeare, the Open Eye, the 92nd Street Y/Makor, and the New York premiere of composer Aaron Jay Kernitz’s The Four Seasons of Futurist Cuisine at Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall. As a writer, his articles have appeared in New Hibernia Review, The Steinbeck Review, Theatre History Studies, and Didaskalia, His book, Encore! The Renaissance of Wisconsin Opera Houses, published by the Wisconsin Historical Society Press, focuses upon the renovation and restoration of historic theaters in Wisconsin and has received a National Indie Excellence Award, a National Best Book Award, a ForeWord Review Book Award, and the Theatre Historical Society of America’s Outstanding Book of the Year Award. He currently teaches at Mercy College and is serving as lyricist and book writer on on a musical adaptation of George Bernard Shaw’s Mrs. Warren’s Profession with Michael Dilthey. An evening of his one-act plays will be presented this fall at the Players Club in Manhattan.

The best things HONY’s Brandon Stanton said at Comic Con

On Sunday, at a Comic Con panel dedicated to his upcoming book Little Humans, Brandon Stanton of the wildly popular Humans of New York (HONY) blog shared what he thought brought his success.

hony

Stanton, like many of the people who are featured on and follow this site, is a storyteller.

If you don’t know HONY the site is part photography blog and part photojournalism without specifically being either. Stanton will find random people on the street, whoever catches his eye and asks to take their photo. Stanton pairs his photos with stories from the subjects which can be one sentence answers to questions, paragraph long stories describing their best or worst moments, to something interesting they did that day. The end result is special- it’s not your normal street photography.

I can’t really categorize his work and that’s what he was going for:

  1. “it is more important to be different than it is to be good.”

From his untrained and completely self-taught photo techniques Stanton grew to be an internet sensation with over 10 million fans and just completing a UN sponsored tour.

What he offers is a view of the world we haven’t seen before- or at least- not the way he does.

  1. “You have to be consistent even when you know no one is paying attention.”

This is one of the most difficult things to do. But this is also the truest advice. You need to write, make art, and practice your craft every damn day. Even if you know no one is taking notice, you need to do it for yourself because:

  1. “the lion’s share of the effort comes before you have your first true fan”

To get to that one fan, the one who found you and likes your work because of what it is- not because they’re a friend of a friend or family member- you have to always have something to show. You have to keep promoting yourself and you have to be present- which isn’t too hard in today’s social media world.

But, as Stanton says, the internet and prevalence of social media is a “double-edged sword.”

  1. “Everyone is vying to be heard.”

Which is why you have to be the most unique, the most disciplined, and the most confident. Even if you didn’t produce your best work today, you will keep working until you do.

Write everyday even if it’s crap- put something out there. Because, you need to know how to make mistakes and learn from them.

  1. “Formal education is dangerous, school teaches you how to do something right. If you wanna make something cool you need to learn to make mistakes.”

That one kind of speaks for itself.

Excerpt from Love Poems

The Furious Gazelle is continuing to serialize Charles Bane’s new book of poetry, Love Poems. You can find more of his poetry here.

You A Certain Chord

You a certain chord or
movement of a dance as
you crash in a tide and spill
like music or drugs into blood
and we down onto sheets,
your hair in kapok roots and
I think what bird is this, with
wings outspread, crying under
me?

When I Despair

When I despair, I hold
to you, the you that
cannot imagine floes or
among the masses one sees
everyday pained in
newspaper photos, the loss
of all. What can’t be
endured is separation.
I write, but you are my
religion too and I think
if the world could only glimpse
one face, all would be remade.
Is this not so? Can we walk with
all the population on the boulevards,
and lay all together with our
hands across our chests, looking
at the stars?

Charles Bane, Jr. is the American author of The Chapbook ( Curbside Splendor, 2011) and Love Poems ( Kelsay Books, 2014). His work was described by the Huffington Post as “not only standing on the shoulders of giants, but shrinking them.” A writing contributor for The Gutenberg Project, he is a current nominee as Poet Laureate of Florida.

Stimulate by Kate Bailey

Playwright Kate Bailey takes zombies to a new level in her short play, Stimulate. Click here to read.

Kate Bailey is originally from Baton Rouge, LA. She holds a BA in Theatre Performance from Louisiana State University. She has studied playwriting at Chicago Dramatists and is currently an MFA candidate at the University of New Orleans. “Stimulate” was first performed as part of 6×6, a ten-minute play festival at Southern Rep Theatre in New Orleans.

“Untitled” from “Love Poems” by Charles Bane

The Furious Gazelle is continuing to serialize Charles Bane’s new book of poetry, Love Poems. You can find more of his poetry here.

Untitled

Let it cut deeper
love, until it flows
inside the blood

It Flows Unstopped

It flows unstopped
into waters I have never
seen; into a father’s arms
holding you when you sleep
or a panther drinking as your fingers
rake my hair. It is rockets
over skies and buds unseen,
and the cloaks of night arching as
a life is put away and another
dawns and spills in ink.

Charles Bane, Jr. is the American author of The Chapbook (Curbside Splendor, 2011) and Love Poems (Kelsay Books, 2014). His work was described by the Huffington Post as “not only standing on the shoulders of giants, but shrinking them.” A writing contributor for The Gutenberg Project, he is a current nominee as Poet Laureate of Florida.

The Measure of a Man, by H. Rossiter

My shoes are old and frayed around the soles. A lot like me. Frayed soles, frayed souls, my granny used to say. She noticed a man’s shoes before she noticed anything else about him, his eyes or his suit or even his hair. When I was young, I wore cap toe oxfords, spit polished. Now I wear whatever I can find in the church charity bin.

I’m proud of my hair, though. You got worth if you got good hair, is what I always say. I’m not one of those old geezers who comb a few leftover wisps of sad gray over a bald skull. Not me. I’ve got a full head. Thick and strong. It’s steel gray and been that way since I was twenty two. Haven’t felt a woman’s hands in my hair since…let’s just say it’s been a long, long time. But I see them look at it, the meals-on-wheels ladies, the district nurse. I see their fingers aching to stroke it. Until they look down and see my shoes. Continue reading

Newer posts

© 2018 The Furious Gazelle

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑